Our Michigan motorcycle accident lawyers know you probably have many questions involving your current situation. We try to answer many of those questions below. These are the most frequent questions we are often asked by clients who visit our office.

Of course, if you have a question specific to your case and would like to speak with one of our attorneys, we are here to help. Please call us at (8oo) 606-1717 and we will listen to your story and provide you with your best options. This will cost you nothing. In fact, we will only accept payment if we are able to settle your case!

Yes. If you want to ride each of your motorcycles in Michigan without a helmet, you must have the required medical coverage on each motorcycle insurance policy covering each motorcycle.
A requirement of at least $20,000 in medical coverage is required of Michigan motorcyclists by the new law. It is a specific coverage required to be purchased on your Michigan motorcycle insurance policy. The required medical coverage is not a Personal Injury Protection or PIP coverage, and can not be satisfied as part of the PIP medical coverage on your auto policy, as well as your medical coverage through your health insurance.
The medical coverage required by the new law is required on your motorycycle policy, for each motorcycle, as oppossed to medical coverage elsewhere, (i.e., on auto policy, health insurance, medicare, Medicaid, etc.)

Yes. Actual contact is not required, but involvement with another vehicle is necessary to qualify for benefits. Whether another vehicle was involved depends on the facts of each case.

Yes, but a motor vehicle must be “involved” to be eligible for Michigan No-Fault benefits. Unfortunately, if the motorcycle does not involve another vehicle (either by direct contact or indirectly like being forced off the road), then there is no right to benefits.

This depends on whether the motorcycle had insurance on it. If the bike was insured, you can make a No-Fault claim against the negligent driver for payment of medical bills, lost wages, and other benefits.

Yes, if the the biker was negligent in driving his motorcycle. If he had motorcycle insurance on the bike, the insurance company will pay the settlement.

Yes. If you suffered a serious and permanent disfigurement from your road rash injuries, you can sue the negligent driver that unlawfully entered your lane of traffic and caused your accident.

Most bikers in Michigan buy the wrong motorcycle insurance, even though they ask their insurance agent for “full coverage.” To find out what type of policy you need to buy, request our FREE REPORT called “The Michigan Motorcycle Insurance Report” before you go for your next ride.

In Michigan, a person injured in a motorcycle accident must generally file a lawsuit within 3 years under the statute of limitations. If you fail to meet that deadline, your case will be destroyed forever and you cannot sue for your injuries. It is essential that you contact an experienced Michigan accident and injury lawyer as soon as possible so that you do not lose your rights to a fair settlement.

In cases involving minors or legally incapacitated persons, the limitations periods are often longer. To get specific information about your case, you should contact our Michigan accident and injury law firm at (800) 606-1717.

If you did not buy collision coverage, you will have to pay for the damages and reapairs to your motorcycle even if you were not at-fault in the accident. However, there are exceptions. First, you can seek payment from an at-fault driver and owner of an automobile if the driver and owner of the automobile were uninsured. Second, if a driver of a motorcycle negligently causes damages to your motorcycle, you can seek payment for the damages and repairs to your motorcycle from the driver and owner of the other motorcycle. Finially, if your motorcycle was parked in a legal, safe and reasonable manner and was struck by an automobile, the damages to your motorcycle are recoverable from the insurer of the owner or operator of the automobile involved in the accident.

If you did not buy Collision coverage, you will have to pay for the damages and repairs to your motorcycle even if you were not at-fault in the accident. However, there are exceptions. First, you can seek payment from an at-fault driver and the owner of an automobile if the driver and owner of the car were uninsured. Second, if a driver of a motorcycle negligently causes damages to your motorcycle, you can seek payment for the damages and repairs to your motorcycle from the driver and owner of the other motorcycle. Finially, if your motorcycle was parkend in a legal, safe and reasonable manner and was struck by an automobile, the damages to your motorcycle are recoverable from the insurer of the owner or operator of the automobile involved in the accident.